I am obsessed with time as experienced through photography. Each artistic medium uses time differently, and photography is the one I can express myself in the best.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

András Ladocsi swam competitively for 14 years before devoting himself to photography. The long training sessions, introspective and mentally demanding; the hours spent alone in the pool, have come to bear in a photographic practice imbued with quiet, careful thought. Ladocsi’s approach to his subjects – the swimmers and dancers, boxers and martial arts enthusiasts; friends, strangers, places suffused with the rare light of the morning or late afternoon – is tender and contemplative: a meditation on intimacy and moment, on touch and the body in movement; as a vehicle for self-expression; a means to connect with one another. 

 

 

 

 

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And yet in his work there is also the surreal and the absurd: a man half naked, his head draped in fabric; another man, anchored to the floor with clay. As with the graceful, paradoxical stillness of Ladocsi’s images of bodies in motion, the surreality of these scenes exposes the constructed, composed nature of a medium that implies immediacy, instantaneousness. “I started to work with photography because it was fun, I enjoyed it,” says Ladocsi. “I don’t search for what’s typically funny or sad, rather I try to find something new and surprising, which can also happen appear surreal or humorous. And of course something can be super serious to me and ridiculous for someone else.”

Here Ladocsi – speaking from his native Budapest, where he studied photography at the Moholy-Nagy University of Art and Design – takes Parcel through his creative process.

 

 

 

 

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What draws you to the themes you explore in your work?

Usually I focus on what I am surrounded by, for example at the moment I am working with eating disorders and body image. I have always been intrigued by the dynamics of social groups, and by identity – it seems to be a theme that runs through my work. And then I love to work with texture, and I am amazed by light – so very simple things as well. 

 

 

 

 

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How does a series typically develop?

Mostly I work with my friends or strangers from the street. I like to write short ideas and make sketches but I prefer to have only a rough idea and let the environment and subject inspire me when I am shooting. Then I’ll arrange the pictures in a sequence to see what I need to add or change for the series to become a whole.

andrasladocsi.com

 

 

 

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